Introduction to Environmental Health and Policy

Lynn R. Goldman, M.D., M.S., MPH, a pediatrician and an epidemiologist, is the Michael and Lori Milken Dean and Professor of Environmental and Occupational Health at the Milken Institute School of Public Health at the George Washington University. She is a renowned expert in pediatric environmental health and chemicals policy. She has contributed academic scholarship that has helped to shape this field of study. She also has engaged in translating research to policy through writing policy analyses and via Congressional testimony in service of successful efforts by Congress to achieve passage of reforms both to federal pesticide law (the 1996 Food Quality Protection Act) and federal chemicals law (the 2016 Lautenberg Chemical Safety Act for the 21st Century) as well as legislation to establish California’s Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program. She was previously Professor of Environmental Health Sciences at the Bloomberg School of Public Health (1999-2010); Assistant Administrator for Toxic Substances at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, where she directed the Office of Chemical Safety and Prevention (1993 – 1998); and Chief of the Division of Environmental and Occupational Disease Control (as well as other positions) at the California Department of Public Health. She completed a BS and MS from UC Berkeley, an MD from UC San Francisco; an MPH from Johns Hopkins University; and pediatric residency training at the UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital in Oakland. She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) and received the NAM Walsh McDermott Award for service to the academy. She a recipient of the Heinz Award for Global Environmental Change and the American Public Health Association Environment Section’s Homer M. Calver Award. Currently, is a Trustee of the Environmental Defense Fund; chair of the board for the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health; a member of the NIH National Advisory Environmental Health Sciences Council; chairs the NIH Advisory Committee for the ECHO Study; and serves on the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine Environmental Health Matters Initiative. She has received alumna awards from Hopkins (Woodrow Wilson Award for Excellence in Government and member of the Hopkins Society of Scholars); UCSF (150th Anniversary Alumni Excellence Award); and the UC Berkeley School of Public Health (Alumna of the Year and its Influential Alumni Award).

Contact: goldmanl@gwu.edu

Richard Jackson M.D., MPH, is professor emeritus at the Fielding School of Public Health at the University of California, Los Angeles. A pediatrician, he has served in many leadership positions with the California Health Department, including the highest as the State Health Officer. For nine years he was Director of the CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health and received the Presidential Distinguished Service award. In October, 2011 he was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. Jackson was instrumental in establishing the California Birth Defects Monitoring Program and creating state and national laws to reduce risks from pesticides, especially to farm workers and children. While at CDC he established major environmental public health programs and instituted the federal effort to “biomonitor” chemical levels in the US population. He has received its Hero Award from the Breast Cancer Fund, Lifetime Achievement Awards from the Public Health Law Association and the New Partners for Smart Growth, the John Heinz Award for national leadership in the Environment, and the Sedgwick Medal, the highest award of the American Public Health Association. In 2015 he received the Henry Hope Reed Award for his contributions to the field of Architecture. Dick Jackson lectures and speaks on many issues, particularly those related to built environment and health. He has co-authored the books: Urban Sprawl and Public Health, Making Healthy Places, and Designing Healthy Communities for which he hosted a four hour PBS series. He has served on many environmental and health boards, as well as the Board of Directors of the American Institute of Architects. He is an elected honorary member of the American Society of Landscape Architects as well as the American Institute of Architects.

Contact: dickjackson@ucla.edu

Keshia M. Pollack Porter, Ph.D, MPH, is the Vice Dean for Faculty and a Bloomberg Centennial Professor of Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She also directs the Bloomberg School’s Institute for Health and Social Policy and is part of the leadership team at the Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions. Dr. Pollack Porter is a health equity scholar studying active play and active transportation, safe built environments, and the nexus of transportation and health. Policy engagement is central to her research and practice, and Dr. Pollack Porter is also a leader in advancing tools and strategies that promote health in all policies.

Contact: kpollac1@jhu.edu

Kathryn Santoro, MPP, joined NIHCM in 2004 and currently leads the organization’s health policy portfolio. In this capacity, she conducts research and analysis on health policy issues in support of improving practices used by health care decision makers and industry leaders. Previously, Ms. Santoro was a Communications Assistant with Robert Betz Associates, a health policy consulting firm, and a Project Consultant for Women in Government/Digene Corporation, where she led the development of a state-by-state report card on cervical cancer screening. In 2019, Ms. Santoro completed the Emerging Women Executives in Healthcare Leadership program at the T.H. Chan School of Public Health at Harvard University. She received her master’s degree in public policy and women’s studies from The George Washington University and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in political science and women’s studies from Villanova University.

Contact: ksantoro@nihcm.org

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