Medicaid Innovations: Can Managed Care Cut Costs and Improve Value?

According to a recent survey, a number of states have expressed interest in expanding managed care approaches within their Medicaid programs. But while managed care may present an opportunity for better delivery of care, it presents challenges within certain populations and geographic areas.

Inside Deficit Reduction: What It Means for Medicare

Medicare has been a keenly debated topic in discussions of how to reduce the deficit. It accounts for a large and growing share of both federal spending and of the national economy, although the projected pace of growth is now at a historic low. Its policies often set the pace for the rest of the health care system.

Inside Deficit Reduction: What It Means for Health Care

After much heated debate on the U.S. debt limit, the Budget Control Act of 2011, containing more than $900 billion in spending reductions over 10 years, was passed on August 2. The members of the Super Committee created by that law are hard at work, and the process is in gear to achieve at least $1.2 trillion in additional deficit reduction — either through Congress adopting the committee’s recommendations or through further automatic spending cuts.

Managing Costs and Improving Care: Team-based Care of the Chronically Ill

The high and rising cost of health care is a central concern for governments at all levels, employers and families. A large portion of the cost problem can be traced to the care received by persons with chronic conditions like asthma or diabetes. Treating those with multiple chronic conditions, including the elderly and disabled populations, accounts for 30 percent of total U.S. health care spending as of 2010. Half of this amount is spent by Medicare and Medicaid on behalf of beneficiaries eligible for both programs.

Accountable Care Organizations: A New Paradigm for Health Care Delivery?

In addition to expanding coverage to 32 million previously uninsured Americans, the health reform law of 2010 aims to improve the health of the population and the quality of health care delivery, while reducing costs. One tool to pursue these goals is the creation of a national voluntary program for accountable care organizations (ACOs). The law authorizes Medicare, beginning next year, to contract with accountable care organizations in a Medicare Shared Savings Program. ACOs provide financial incentives to improve the coordination and quality of care for Medicare beneficiaries, while reducing costs.

Community Coalitions: Pursuing Better Quality Health Care One Locality at a Time

The fact that health care costs vary sharply around the country is becoming well known; less understood is that there is also wide regional variation in health care quality. Some regions enjoy low cost, high quality care while others report high cost, lower quality care. Some people have ready access to providers and good care; others may not be receiving necessary care or may be receiving unnecessary, health-endangering care. The root cause of these differences has been the subject of many studies and discussions.

Making the Case for Prevention: Tales from the Field

To improve the health of communities and the general population, an array of health reformers, states and businesses alike are all looking to a range of prevention measures such as chronic disease management, alcohol and smoking cessation, and obesity programs. The hope is that these measures will also improve value and control costs.

A Reporter’s Toolkit: Health Care Costs

This toolkit, supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, will help you understand trends in U.S. health spending, and some of the reasons why spending is going up. We also cover some ideas for restraining health care costs. In addition, this resource offers story ideas, selected experts with contact information, selected websites, and a glossary.

Making the Grade: Improving the U.S. Health System

The U.S. health care system is often touted as a model for the rest of the world. We are clearly a leader in costs, but how well are we performing in return for our high investment? How do we do compare to benchmarks of achievable performance? And is performance getting better?

Health Information Technology and Its Future: More Than the Money

Health information technology (IT) wins many honorable mentions. It is viewed by respected analysts and presidential candidates in both parties as a tool with the potential to save lives, improve efficiency and increase the overall quality of our health care delivery system.

Comparative Effectiveness: Can We Get Better Health Value for the Dollars We Spend?

Comparative effectiveness research holds out the tantalizing prospect of making it easier for patients and their doctors to choose the best treatment, thus improving quality. At the same time, it could also justify denying or reducing payment for a host of treatments or procedures that may be clinically ineffective or unworthy of their high price.