Day 3: Co-Designing a Simpler System

Keynote 3: “Are They Trustworthy?” – The Paradox of the Informed Patient

Derek M. Griffith, Ph.D., is professor of medicine, health and society, and he is the Founder and Director of the Center for Research on Men’s Health at Vanderbilt University. Dr. Griffith’s program of research focuses on developing and implementing behavioral and policy strategies to achieve equity in health and well-being by race, ethnicity and gender. He has collaborated with colleagues in Canada, Ireland, New Zealand and the United States to address institutional racism in public health departments and systems, to pursue men’s health equity, and to promote the health and well-being of African American and Latino men through policy and precision lifestyle medicine interventions. He has been the principal investigator of research grants from the American Cancer Society, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, other foundations, and several institutes within the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Griffith is a contributor to and an editor of – Men’s Health Equity: A Handbook (Routledge, 2019), and Racism: Science and Tools for the Public Health Professional (APHA Press, 2019). In recognition of his research on “eliminating health disparities that vary by race, ethnicity and gender”, Dr. Griffith won the Tom Bruce Award from the Community-Based Public Health Caucus of the American Public Health Association.

Contact: derek.griffith@vanderbilt.edu


Panel 3: Using the Patient Voice to Drive Systemic Change

Hala Durrah, MTA, is an independent patient family engagement consultant and nationally recognized advocate. Her passion for patient family engagement work stems from her experience as a mother of a chronically ill child who has undergone two liver transplants and a bone marrow transplant. As an expert in patient partnership and engagement, she serves as a consultant on a number of projects focused on patient centered measurement, quality improvement, patient safety, health equity, child health, healthcare transformation, health IT, patient partnered research, and patient experience. She serves on a number of national committees and boards, most recently being elected to American Board of Emergency Medicine as their first public member director. Ms. Durrah recently founded Patient Advocates Transforming Healthcare (PATH), a diverse coalition of independent patient/family/caregiver/community engagement leaders seeking to transform healthcare through our collective experiences and expertise. This passionate group of leaders seeks to reimagine healthcare and create an equitable role for patients, families, caregivers and communities.

Contact: haladurrah@gmail.com

Sarah Hudson Scholle, MPH, DrPH, is vice president of research and analysis at NCQA. Dr. Scholle is an expert in health services and quality measurement in multiple settings and has a demonstrated record of moving innovative measurement concepts into implementation, particularly through NCQA’s Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS). Dr Scholle leads the National Collaborative for Innovation in Quality Measurement (NCINQ), one of the original AHRQ/CMS Centers of Excellence in Pediatric Quality measurement and a current grantee in the Pediatric Quality Measurement Program. In addition, she has led or participated in projects to develop quality measures for providers, health plans and inpatient psychiatry facilities. Her research has informed the implementation of new quality measures for public and private accountability programs. She is leading NCQA’s partnership with the American Psychiatric Association on a CMS-funded cooperative agreement award to develop new quality measures for mental health and substance use care for providers. She has extensive experience in the implementation of patient-reported outcome measures (including an ongoing project on assessing and addressing pain in primary care) as well as other efforts to evaluate practice transformation. Dr Scholle is also an expert in care for vulnerable populations; she leads a contract from the CMS Office of Minority of Health on health equity and a project to evaluate innovative tools for addressing social risk.

Contact: scholle@ncqa.org

Robert Saunders, Ph.D., is research director for Payment and Delivery Reform at Duke-Margolis. In this role, he directs a portfolio of payment and delivery reform initiatives, which focus on ACOs, alternative payment models for specialty care, new payment and delivery approaches for serious illness care, and translating evidence to policy-relevant options. Prior to joining Duke-Margolis, Dr. Saunders was a Senior Director and then Senior Advisor to the President of the National Quality Forum, where he managed a large federally-funded project that provided recommendations on quality measures for 20 different federal programs and directed special projects on topics including data, payment reform, systems engineering, and the future of healthcare quality measurement. He was previously Senior Program Officer at the Institute of Medicine and managed health care legislative affairs for Representative Rush D. Holt.

Contact: robert.saunders@duke.edu